Blick

The month of October brings many wonderful things – a chill in the autumn air, a parade of costumed trick-or-treaters, apple picking, and National Arts & Humanities month! Started in 1993 to encourage Americans to explore new facets of the arts and humanities in their lives, and to begin a lifelong habit of participation in the arts and humanities, this is a month the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards celebrate whole heartedly. As entries continue to decorate our desktops and satisfy our literary ear, we are lucky to have Blick Art Materials & Utrecht Art Supplies as a sponsor and as a partner in supporting the arts and the humanities.

Each year Blick generously supports the Scholastic Awards by donating gift certificates that are presented at regional ceremonies and awarded to our national medalist art educators (no small feat! This adds up to nearly $70,000 of support!). Blick is also an annual sponsor of a Gold Medal Art Portfolio Award, where the recipient receives a $10,000 academic award. Among the recent Blick Art Materials & Utrecht Art Supplies Art Portfolio Gold Medalists are 2014 medalist Ellie Braun, 2013 medalist Alex Reynolds, and 2012 medalist Sarah Devlin. Their continued support of the Scholastic Awards allows for diverse benefits to the arts, from enabling educators to purchase art supplies for their classrooms to giving students the confidence to pursue their creative dreams. Read More

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Again and Again and Again (detail), 168” x 72” Adobe Photoshop, Digital Print, Polaroid / Emulsion Transfer

Country, family, community, beliefs, race, cultural norms and accepted behaviors: we are born into this world with many of these factors pre-determined for us. So what’s a teenager to do? As Portfolio Medalists Patrick Zapien and Jackson Trice see it, there’s just one choice: to rebel.

For Jackson, a born-and-bred Southerner, “I Should Be Leaving” deals with how she feel s about her place in the world, coming of age, and the natural urge to revolt that comes with it.

“It goes back to this central question I’ve posed for myself which is: what makes me want to rebel?” she reflects. “Perhaps it is in my blood. And perhaps, I dare to say, I am okay with it.” Read More

Silent Messenger ~ Raven- Wyoming black granite ~ 12Óh x 60Ów x 30Ód Sarcophagus- Colorado red sandstone ~ 14Óh x 70Ów x 40Ód Collection of National Museum of Wildlife Art

Silent Messenger. Raven- Wyoming black granite, Sarcophagus- Colorado red sandstone. Collection of National Museum of Wildlife Art, photo via stevekestrel.com

Can art change the world? Artist Steve Kestrel, who works with found stone in Northern Colorado, certainly hopes so. For his sculpture, Silent Messenger, Kestrel sculpted a six-foot long sarcophagus from Colorado sandstone and placed a giant black granite raven, lying on its back, within it. Currently on view at Wyoming’s National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, it sends a chilling message.

“I usually celebrate the earth’s flora and fauna in my work,” Kestrel explains. But this time he wanted to pose a challenge: “In the next century, will our societies and artists celebrate the remaining wildlife or mourn their passing?”

Wyoming writer Cate Cabot thought that this sculpture held a potent message not just for adults, but for students throughout Wyoming, so she designed The Messenger: Silent No More Project. This spring the project began with field trips to see Silent Messenger that carried back to their classrooms. Read More

Steven Paul InstaThe Scholastic Art & Writing Awards are excited to announce a larger than life public display of 2014 Gold Medalist Steven Paul’s photo, Lost Time!

As part of their support for the Awards, Colossal Media is installing Lost Time, a photograph by Gold Medalist Steven Paul, a senior at Edward R. Murrow High School, as a massive, hand-painted public mural on the wall of a building at Broadway and Bedford Streets in Brooklyn.

We stopped by over the weekend to check out the process, and you can still watch them paint today as they finish up painting the face and hair. There is a beautiful pedestrian mall with tables situated under umbrellas and plenty of yummy restaurants, so grab a slice of New York style pizza and watch the Wall Dogs work their magic! Read More

This post originally appeared on Scholastic’s On Our Minds blog. By Brittany Sullivan.

Tyra AThe 91st annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards National Celebration is right around the corner, and we couldn’t be more excited to celebrate some of the most outstanding young artists and writers from all across the country. On Friday, June 6, national Scholastic Art & Writing Award-winning students will be honored during the National Awards Ceremony, live-webcasted from the world-famous Carnegie Hall in New York City.

Since the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers announced the 2014 National Scholastic Art & Writing Awards winners in March, we have had the privilege of getting to know some of these talented teens, including the Art Portfolio Gold Medal Award recipients. This year, 16 high school seniors received the Portfolio Gold Medal Award, the highest Scholastic Art & Writing Awards honor, which includes a $10,000 cash scholarship. After their big win, the Portfolio Gold Medalists have made television appearances, been featured in local papers and done radio interviews to discuss their award and what it took to get on the path to Carnegie Hall.

Before the National Celebration kicks-off in New York City next week, we wanted to give you a glimpse into the creative minds of the eight Portfolio Gold Medal artists. From vital organs made out of fabric to quirky self-portraits and even intricate pencil shavings sculptures, these eight teens are sure to impress you with their incredible talent, undeniable creativity and bold personalities. Read More

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Contour by Luis Zepeda, 2014 Gold Medal Art Portfolio

Have you ever had a dream where you find yourself naked at school? While that may be a nightmare for most, Luis Zepeda likes to infuse his works with a touch of humor, which in his 2014 Gold Medal Art Portfolio, the humor comes from a nude Zepeda. More of his work is shown below. Shannon Daniels aims to communicate acute observations about her family based on her experiences growing up with a strong link to her parents and grandparents in New York City. “Persimmon peels left on the kitchen table. The chipped keys of a piano that is out of tune. Everyday objects like these reveal whole histories of the people who use, save, and discard them.” says Daniels.

Daniels, a student at Stuyvesant High School in New York City, continues to describe her portfolio in her writers statement: “To approach and relay my encounters with giant, ubiquitous beasts – death, racism, and poverty – I have learned to begin with the ordinary, the small. From hearing family stories over the kitchen table to grocery-shopping in Chinatown market stalls, I’ve discovered that moments that are dismissed as banal or mundane can unfold daily, unspoken truths.” You can read excerpts from her pieces Scale (below) and Ars Poetica (following Luis’ work). Read More