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Still from Alumni Microgrant recipient Ariel Sobel’s film You Asked For It

Earlier this year we debuted our newest initiative: The Alumni Microgrant Program. With support from our Alumni Council, we were able to award four of our Alums monetary grants to help them with their creative projects. Check out what our Alums have been up to!

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Philip Pearlstein speaking at Art & Writing @ Night on May 10, 2016

Philip Pearlstein speaking at Art & Writing @ Night on May 10, 2016. Photo by Diane Bondareff

On May 10, Philip Pearlstein joined the Alliance at Art & Writing @ Night and treated our guests to a retelling of one of his many remarkable stories; this one relating to his experience as a Scholastic Awards Alumnus during World War II. Today we’re happy to share it with you too! We hope you enjoy this very special piece of American and Scholastic Awards history. Read More

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Typewriter, Photography by Sarah Wasinger, Grade 10, Age 16, Fairfax High School, Fairfax, VA

Typewriter, Photography by Sarah Wasinger, Grade 10, Age 16, Fairfax High School, Fairfax, VA

We are excited to announce the first two Residents of A Suite of One’s Own, our newly launched Writers-in-Residency Program for Alumni of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards! The residency will be held at the historic Roosevelt Hotel in Midtown Manhattan.

Katie McGinnis, novelist

E.J. García, poet

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Alumni Microgrant recipient Karina Puente displays her work.

Alumni Microgrant recipient Karina Puente displays her work.

We are excited to announce the launch of our first Microgrant Program for Alumni of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, developed by the Alumni Council. The microgrant program is designed to support creative projects proposed by our alumni. Here’s a glimpse at what our Alumni Grantees will be working on: Read More

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Donald Lipski in front of his installation The Candy Box, 2013. Plastics, steel, LED lighting. 21’ x 13’ x 14”. For the new Pinnacle Bank Arena in the Haymarket Section of Lincoln, NE, Lipski created a giant box of chocolates, paying homage to Lincoln's history as a center of chocolate manufacturing. Many of the chocolates have shapes and images that relate to symbols of Lincoln, past and present. (Photo: John Grant)

Donald Lipski in front of his installation The Candy Box, 2013. Plastics, steel, LED lighting. 21’ x 13’ x 14”. For the new Pinnacle Bank Arena in the Haymarket Section of Lincoln, NE, Lipski created a giant box of chocolates, paying homage to Lincoln’s history as a center of chocolate manufacturing. Many of the chocolates have shapes and images that relate to symbols of Lincoln, past and present. (Photo: John Grant)

 

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards presents the Alumni Achievement Award to past Scholastic Awards recipients who have become innovators and trendsetters in their fields. The 2015 Honoree is Donald Lipski, a renowned sculptor who has received numerous awards throughout his career, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, three grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Rome Prize. He is represented by Galerie Lelong in New York. His work is in the public collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Detroit Institute of Art, among many other prominent institutions. Recently, his work has focused on large-scale works for public spaces. Read More

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou know the drill: everyone goes around the circle and says their name, where they’re from, and some “interesting fact” about themselves. It’s standard first-day-of-school-or-camp-or-other-student-activity procedure. Meanwhile you sit there, the very last person in the circle, knowing that there’s really no way you could remember all these names anyway, but especially not now since all you can do is focus on coming up with that one “interesting fact.” It has to be something unique and memorable (because first impressions are important), but not something too weird (because first impressions are important), and it should by no means evoke any kind of follow-up question (because second impressions are even more important, and you’re just not ready for that yet). Then there’s the pressure of going last—these people are expecting some grand finale, and really how can you beat “I once went skydiving with my grandpa” kid? Flustered, you end up blurting out something (like: “I’m a fan of Netflix” or “my favorite color is aquamarine”) that, while important, doesn’t really define you (except that now it does—you will be “aqua girl” in the minds of all your peers for at least the next few hours).

That’s kind of how I feel right now.

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