Norman Brandes won a 3rd Prize for Poetry in 1936.

Norman Brandes won a 3rd Prize for Poetry in 1936.

Phyllis Heisterkamp won an art scholarship in 1942.

Phyllis Heisterkamp won an art scholarship in 1942.

Doris Lynne-Garter won an award for poetry in 1962.

Doris Lynne-Garter won an Award for poetry in 1962.

Mesfin Million won an award for a charcoal drawing in 1987.

Mesfin Million won an Award for a charcoal drawing in 1987.

Mike Lindenthal won an art award in 1992.

Mike Lindenthal won an art Award in 1992.

Brittany Cartie won an American Visions award in 2010.

Brittany Cartie won for American Visions in 2010.

 

 

 

 

Guest post by our Archivist, Haley Richardson

While preparing for the annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards celebration in New York City, I’ve been hunting in the archives for photographs of past Award winners, which I’ve come to think of as tiny time capsules of teenage life. From the emphasis on neat up-dos and fancy neckwear in the 1930s to the more informal and whimsical self portraits of the ’00s, these snapshots are visual reminders of great amount of social change over time, but also of the broad shared realities of being a teenager.

Submitted by students and printed in publications like Senior Scholastic and Literary Cavalcade, these photographs — be they professional prints made by school photographers, group shots with best friends or teachers, or Photo Booth images captured in a computer lab — are a great way to celebrate the accomplishment of individual students and, from an archival perspective, to commemorate a specific moment in the life of an artist.

Filmmaker Stanley Brakhage won a First Prize in Short Story in 1951.

Filmmaker Stan Brakhage won a Short Story award in 1951.

Tom Liska won a Gold Medal for his art portfolio in 2000.

Tom Liska won a Gold Medal for his art portfolio in 2000.

Catherine Chen won a Gold Medal in art in 2012.

Catherine Chen won a Gold Medal in art in 2012.

 

So, to the winners of the 2013 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, please help us make the National Celebration a reflection of you and your personality by uploading your self-portrait, an audio clip describing your Award-winning work and the inspiration behind it, and a video greeting introducing yourself and talking about your goals as an artist or writer.

A selection of photographs and videos will be displayed on screen during the Carnegie Hall Ceremony, which we’re webcasting LIVE for all to see this year (special consideration will be given to videos featuring original songs, so break out the musical instruments!). Audio clips will be featured in our 2013 National Exhibition, in our touring exhibitions, and on your media page in our online galleries.

In addition, all media uploads will be added to our growing and dynamic archives! Help us preserve the legacy of the Scholastic Awards by adding your unique voice!

Upload “Your Media” from your Scholastic Awards Account at http://www.artandwriting.org/ors/registration.

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